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The Low Glycemic Index and Sugar


Nutritionists once believed that all simplistic sugars resulted in a quick rise in blood sugar and a rapid digestion process, and that the scenario was the complete opposite for “complex carbohydrates”.  However, it is now known that this is not always the true to the case. While many sugary and sweet tasting foods do have  increased or high GI’s, some foods that contain like white bread and potatoes rank even higher than that of (sucrose) table sugar or honey!

The human body will perform best when  the blood sugar levels are kept consistent and regulated. When blood sugar drops too low, an individual will become hungrier with a heftier appetite and lethargic with decreased energy. When blood sugar levels go too high, the brain sends signals to the pancreas so that it will secrete more insulin. Insulin brings your blood sugar back down, but primarily by converting the excess sugar to stored fat. Also, the greater the rate of increase in your blood sugar, the more chance that your body will release an excess amount of insulin, and drive your blood sugar back down too low.

Furthermore, when an individual consumes foods that cause a large and rapid glycemic response, you may feel an initial elevation in energy and mood as your blood sugar rises, but this is followed by a cycle of increased fat storage, lethargy, and more hunger!

Although increased fat storage may sound bad enough, individuals with diabetes (diabetes mellitus, types 1 and 2) have an even worse problem. Their bodies inability to secrete or process insulin causes their blood sugar to rise too high, leading to a host of additional medical problems.

The theory behind the Glycemic Index is simply to minimize insulin-related problems by identifying and avoiding foods that have the greatest effect on your blood sugar. You can help out your health and diet by incorporating Steviva into your low glycemic diet. It contains no calories, does not metabolize in the body, and helps your body to stabalize its blood sugar and insulin levels.

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